Welcome to Sawyer Seminar on Precarious Work in Asia

This seminar series examines precarious work in a variety of Asian countries (China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Philippines, Republic of Korea, Sri Lanka, Taiwan, and Thailand). By “precarious work,” we refer to the uncertainty, instability and insecurity of work in which risks are borne primarily by workers rather than by employers or the government. The seminar will explore the extent of precarious work in these countries, examine the historical and cultural roots of precarious work, assess the consequences of precarious work for individuals and families in these societies, and consider a variety of political, social and economic policies that might address precarious work and its consequences. Throughout the eighteen months of the seminar, we will attempt to answer these questions in a series of internal seminars involving UNC participants and workshops that will bring in scholars from elsewhere in the U.S. and Asia.

Labor in India Talk on Monday, November 12, 2012 in GEC 1005

Lopsided’ Transition:  Employment Trends and the Politics of Indian Labor in the Era of Globalization
A talk by John Harriss, Professor, Director of the School for International Studies, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, Canada Location: FedEx Global Education Center Room 1005 Monday, November 12th 5:30 PM – 7:00 PM
The structural transformation of the Indian economy is incomplete. While the share of agriculture in GDP has declined sharply, its share of the labor force has not. The agricultural economy is still characterized by extensive small-scale household production, and only a small minority of farming households can produce an income sufficient for family survival. Employment in agriculture has increasingly stagnated and rural non-agricultural employment not expanded as much as might have been hoped. More than 90 per cent of all jobs are ‘informal’ and the absolute numbers of protected ‘formal sector’ jobs declined between 2000 and 2005. There is evidence of the existence of an inverse relationship between output growth and employment growth, and of the effective exclusion of a large share of the labor force from the dynamic, productive sectors of the economy. The paper considers the responses of labor, rural and urban, to these trends, and the significance of the introduction by the Government of India of major new programs offering social protection in order to compensate for the failures of the ‘inclusive growth’ promised in the Eleventh Five Year Plan.

Fall 2011 Speaker Videos

Hedi Gottfried – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lLCtX4QK-dE

Guy Standing – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MbyMM_q2VFg

CK Lee – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RpmrKdNjUpw

Fall 2012 Sawyer Seminar- Precarious Work in Asia

Lopsided’ Transition:  Employment Trends and the Politics of Indian Labor in the Era of Globalization
A talk by John Harriss, Professor, Director of the School for International Studies, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, Canada Location: FedEx Global Education Center Room 1005 Monday, November 12th 5:30 PM – 7:00 PM
The structural transformation of the Indian economy is incomplete. While the share of agriculture in GDP has declined sharply, its share of the labor force has not. The agricultural economy is still characterized by extensive small-scale household production, and only a small minority of farming households can produce an income sufficient for family survival. Employment in agriculture has increasingly stagnated and rural non-agricultural employment not expanded as much as might have been hoped. More than 90 per cent of all jobs are ‘informal’ and the absolute numbers of protected ‘formal sector’ jobs declined between 2000 and 2005. There is evidence of the existence of an inverse relationship between output growth and employment growth, and of the effective exclusion of a large share of the labor force from the dynamic, productive sectors of the economy. The paper considers the responses of labor, rural and urban, to these trends, and the significance of the introduction by the Government of India of major new programs offering social protection in order to compensate for the failures of the ‘inclusive growth’ promised in the Eleventh Five Year Plan.

New book on Japan’s Post Fukushima Future

This new e- book, Tsunami:  Japan’s Post Fukushima Future was written by our Japan partner Machiko Osawa’s husband Jeff Kingston and published by Foreign Policy.

Procedes will go to charities working in Tohoku.

A PDF book can be ordered through the following link:

http://www.foreignpolicy.com/ebooks/tsunami_japans_post_fukushima_future

There is also a kindle edition planned, though it is not out yet.

 

Spring 2012 Public Speaker and Reading Group Sessions

We have two more seminar sessions in the Spring 2012 Semester:

Good Job Creation

Worker Voice

 

Spring 2011 Key events and achievements

Thank you for helping make the Spring 2011 Sawyer Seminar- Precarious Work
in Asia a success.

We kicked of the semester by holding a well attended reception at R&R Grill
on Thursday, January 27.

During the semester, we held 12 Working Group Meetings, with discussions
being facilitated at different times by Kevin Hewison, Arne Kalleberg, John
Pickles, Anne Allison, Federico Luisetti, Yong Cai, Dae-oup Chang, Dennis
Arnold, Jessica Pearlman, Tiantian Yang, Shane Elliott and Joe Bongiovi.

We also held three Public Seminar presentations by Peter Coclanis,
Stephanie Barrientos and Dae-oup Chang and participated in a joint meeting
joining in with the Capturing the Gains Project.

Details on all of these events and readings can be found on the Seminars & Working Group page of this website

We are very much looking forward to upcoming events, including our Asia
Partners meeting in Seoul Korea in July.

We will continue to meet weekly in Hamilton 151 on Thursdays from 3:30- 5pm for our fall 2011 Working Group Meetings

We also have an exciting fall 2001 public speaker series with details outlined on this website

Work and Labor in the News

This feature has now moved to its own page on this site.  Please continue to read and comment there!